Keeping forests standing is one of the most important things you can do to help protect the Amazon. When you symbolically adopt an acre of the Peruvian Amazon through Acre Care, you're helping us fight climate change, protect wildlife, and create sustainable livelihoods- all while ensuring the lungs of the Earth stay standing.

What is Acre Care?

Acre Care is the Amazon Aid Foundation’s platform for direct private protection of the Amazon rainforest. For $40, you can symbolically adopt an acre of the Peruvian Amazon to protect it from the threats of gold mining and deforestation.
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How Does It Work?

100% of your donation goes directly to our partners on the ground with the Amazon Conservation Association and its sister organization in Peru la Asociación para la Conservación de la Cuenca Amazónica in the Madre de Dios region. These organizations manage and protect forest through conservation concessions where funding goes towards park guards, government protection, concession staff, and management of the area.

What Are Conservation Concessions?

Conservation concessions, an innovation written into Peruvian forestry legislation in 2000, provide a unique opportunity for the conservation of large state-owned lands that would otherwise be unmanaged. A conservation concession is a long-term contractual partnership between the national government and a non-government actor, whereby the civil society actor manages state-owned lands for purposes of ecosystem and biodiversity conservation.

Where is Madre de Dios?

Madre de Dios is a region of southeastern Peru where the Amazon rainforest meets the eastern slope of the Andes. Madre de Dios is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet, harboring thousands of plant and animal species. Unfortunately, it is also a hotspot for illegal mining activity which causes rampant deforestation, mercury contamination, and ultimately accelerates the effects of climate change.

Why These Acres?

It has been estimated that we need approximately 80 percent of the trees standing to continue the water cycle and weather patterns that influence the climate of the Amazon and subsequently our planet.Currently, the Amazon has 81 percent of the trees left standing. We are getting dangerously close to altering a stable ecosystem that moderates our global climate. The Amazon as we know it could be consumed in the next 40 years.